Tag Archives: housing

Youth Impact Jeunesse Inc.

Youth Impact Jeunesse offers 19 programs for youth 10 to 24 years across 5 different New Brunswick communities. The programs fall into three different service streams: residential, community outreach and Youth Quest (for homeless youth).

Youth Impact Jeunesse offre 19 programmes aux jeunes de 10 à 24 ans au sein de 5 communautés différentes au Nouveau- Brunswick. Les programmes se concentrent sur les trois services suivants : résidentiels, approche communautaire et Youth Quest (pour des jeunes sans abri).

When I first went I thought I would end up only going once and never continue, but there was something different about Youth QUEST. The environment and atmosphere was very welcoming. In the end everyone was like a little family, and the staff were always willing to help any way they could.

Quand j’y suis allé pour la première fois, j’ai pensé que j’allai abandonner aussitôt et ne jamais revenir, mais il y avait quelque chose de différent chez Youth QUEST. Il y avait une ambiance très chaleureuse. En fin de compte, chacun constituait une sorte de petite famille, et le personnel toujours disponible déployait tous les efforts possibles pour nous aider.

The initiative

Youth Quest Central offers at-risk and homeless youth a safe, non-judgemental environment that fosters a sense of belonging and social inclusion. The goal is to intersect with youth who appear to be in a downward spiral and transform their future prospects.  Key facets of Youth Quest Central:

  • Bilingual “one stop shop” for youth offering services to meet physical, mental health and social needs
  • Services range from laundry, shower, clothing and food, to use of computers and recreational programs, to counselling in the organization’s case management and drug Intervention programs, to education and employment supports
  • Co-located with the administrative office of the organization’s transitional housing program and other employment and educational supports programs.

Youth impact Jeunesse logo

Impact for youth

  • Over 7800 visits to Youth Quest Central in 2014 which represents use of the centre by 485 youth
  • Access to basic personal and emergency services and supplies
  • Linkages to transitional housing
  • Access to educational programming including writing GED exam (high school equivalency)
  • Entry point to a variety of mental health, physical health and lifestyle supports tailored to the individual needs of the young person.

L’initiative

Youth Quest Central offre aux jeunes à risque et sans abri un environnement sécuritaire et sans préjugés qui favorise un sentiment d’appartenance et d’inclusion sociale. Elle a pour but d’aller à la rencontre de jeunes qui sont dans une spirale négative et de transformer leurs perspectives d’avenir. Les principaux aspects de Youth Quest Central sont les suivants :

  •   Un guichet unique bilingue destiné aux jeunes, offrant des services pour répondre à leurs besoins physiques, sociaux et en santé mentale
  •   Les services sont très variés allant de laverie, douche, vêtements et nourriture, jusqu’à l’utilisation d’ordinateurs et de programmes récréatifs, et à du counselling pour l’organisation de gestion de cas et programmes d’intervention en toxicomanie, et du soutien éducatif et professionnel
  •   Bureau commun avec le bureau administratif de l’organisation du programme des logements de transition et autres programmes de soutien en emploi et éducation.

Répercussions chez les jeunes

  • En 2014, Youth Quest Central a reçu plus de 7 800 visiteurs ce qui signifie que 485 jeunes ont eu recours au centre.
  • Accès au personnel de base, aux services et approvisionnements d’urgence
  • Établissement de liens vers les logements de transition
  • Accès à la programmation éducative, y compris se présenter à l’examen GED (équivalence d’études secondaires)
  • Point d’entrée à une variété de services de soutien en santé mentale et physique, et style de vie conçus selon le besoins personnels du jeune.

Home Base Housing

Home Base Housing develops and manages safe and affordable housing and emergency shelter and support services to meet the needs of youth, adults, and families at risk of homelessness in the Kingston area.

HomeBase

“The Youth Services Program helped me to get my apartment, take me to my appointments and get food. They gave me a job, which provided a reference letter; they supplied me with cooking programs. Before Youth Services I was staying in a shelter with nothing and doing nothing.” – Participant, aged 20

“Before moving to RISE, I dropped out of school, was escorting and had anorexia. Being in this program I was able to stop escorting and get over my eating disorder. I graduated High School and am working on moving to my favourite city.” – Participant, aged 19

The initiative:

The Youth Services Program with its goal of ending the cycle of homelessness among youth 16 to 24 years through:

    • Transitional housing units and flexible client supports
    • Teaching and skills development through educational or job opportunities, practising life skills, embracing harm reduction, and providing mental health supports
    • Assisting youth in the community obtain housing in the private or non profit sectors and secure longer term supports to  help them maintain their housing
    • Supporting single mothers and newborns through the provision of housing and supports.

Impact for youth:

    • At any one time 30 formerly homeless or at-risk youth have safe, affordable housing.
    • 8 transitional housing units at the 21 unit apartment building RISE@one4nine permit Home Base staff to quickly move youth out of homelessness or unsafe situations and into a safe place to live. These youth then move on to other forms of housing suited to their needs.
    • 13 long term units have been home to eight individuals since opening in 2012. Other tenants have moved from these apartments into other units in the non-profit and private market sectors.
    • Secure housing and client centered support services lead to client success in mastering life skills, increased attendance at school or work, more involvement with community groups and services, and fewer health risks.

Background

About the Awards

Eva’s Initiatives and the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite are pleased to offer four awards of $25,000 each for organizations working with homeless and at-risk youth.

The goal of the awards is to recognize community initiatives that are:

  • Moving beyond responding to the most basic needs of homeless and at-risk youth
  • Demonstrating significant impacts in the lives of vulnerable youth
  • Delivering programs or services aimed at preventing youth homelessness for example when youth are vulnerable do to encounters with criminal justice system, mental health crises, or when exiting from foster care, for example
  • Breaking the cycle of homelessness among youth by integrating supports such as: housing, education, employment, family connections, and interventions to address mental health concerns and/or addictions. This may also include strategies aimed at harm reduction and increasing the social inclusion of marginalized youth.

This is an Awards program, not a funding stream. The objective is to showcase and celebrate programs in Canada that have demonstrated impact in ending youth homelessness in their communities.

Organizations may self-nominate their own program or initiative.

About Eva’s Initiatives

Eva’s works locally and nationally to prevent, reduce and end youth homelessness in Canada. In Toronto, we operate 3 purpose-built emergency and transitional facilities that focus on family reconnection, harm reduction, employment, education, and life skills programming. Eva’s National Initiatives works to build the capacity of the youth-serving sector and foster systemic change nationally. We do this through an array of programs and projects, including convening the National Learning Community on Youth Homelessness and leading the Mobilizing Local Capacity to End Youth Homelessness Program.

What does Eva’s mean by ‘homeless or at-risk of homelessness’?

Homeless youth are those:

  • without physical shelter – living on the street; sleeping outdoors; staying in shelters and emergency hostels; temporarily staying with friends or ‘couch surfing.’

Youth at-risk are:

  • living where there is family conflict or violence
  • living in overcrowded conditions, physically unsafe dwellings, or illegal dwellings
  • living in a household that is paying so much for housing that there is no money left over for other necessities
  • vulnerable to losing their housing for economic, behavioural, addictions, and/or mental or physical health reasons.
  • Community organizations working with young people in age groups between 15 and 30
  • Organizations working with youth in the housing, health, community services, employment and training, justice, and/or education sectors
  • Organizations working with homeless or at-risk youth in large, medium or smaller-sized urban areas
  • Organizations working with Aboriginal youth on- or off-reserve, as well as organizations operating in rural or northern communities

Who is eligible for a $25,000 award?

Programs or initiatives nominated for this award should be operational for one or more years to have sufficient evidence of preventing, reducing and/or ending youth homelessness.

Applicants must be an incorporated non-profit organization in Canada, or a registered charity or an organization sponsored by, or affiliated with, a registered charity.

How do we nominate a program or initiative?

  • Nomination forms can be downloaded from evasinitiatives.com, or requested from awards@evas.ca
  • Use the nomination form to describe an initiative or program in your organization that is successful in preventing, reducing or ending youth homelessness. The initiative must be operational in 2014 with evidence of results to date.
  • Applications are due by email to awards@evas.ca no later than 9 pm EST on Thursday, January 15, 2015.
  • Send accompanying documents, such as financial statements or annual report, by email or letter mail, postmarked no later than Thursday January 15, 2015. Mailing address is: Eva’s Initiatives, 215 Spadina Ave., Suite 370, Toronto, ON M5T 2C7  Attention:  Awards Program. If emailing a very large document, send it as an attachment in a separate email.

Who chooses the winners?

Eva’s Initiatives has convened a National Review Panel with members from across the country who have extensive experience working with homeless youth and are leaders in ending youth homelessness in Canada. Winners will be announced in March 2015.

What will the National Review Panel look for?

  • Evidence that the initiative works primarily with youth and has been operational for a year or more
  • Innovative service delivery
  • Systems change initiatives and collaborative partnerships
  • Initiatives fostering greater social inclusion of youth
  • Evidence of positive impacts for youth
  • Evidence of a system for measuring results and outcome

Preference may be given to organizations who are not already participating in other ventures supported by Eva’s Initiatives including the Mobilizing Local Capacity to End Youth Homelessness program and the National Learning Community on Youth Homelessness.

For more information contact:

Deborah Hierlihy
Awards Coordinator
awards@evas.ca
(613) 471-1348

Our Sponsor

Eva’s Awards for Ending Youth Homelessness are generously sponsored by the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite.

History




In 2006, Eva’s Initiatives launched the Awards for Innovation, through generous sponsorship from CIBC. Six years of the Innovation Awards recognized the achievements of 18 organizations from coast to coast to coast. With inspiration coming from these award winners, the focus for Eva’s awards program has shifted.

With the launch of the 2014 program, Eva’s and our sponsor the Sprott Foundation are putting the spotlight on what works in terms of preventing, reducing and ending the homelessness that youth experience. This focus challenges us all to think beyond the emergency needs of vulnerable youth. The goal of ending homelessness means equipping youth in multiple domains of their life to achieve greater and longer lasting stability. It also means program impacts that have results on different levels—from housing outcomes, for example, to skill building, employment, improved health and other outcomes.

Eligibility/ Admissibilité

Who can apply?

  • Community organizations working with young people in age groups between 15 and 30
  • Organizations working with youth in the housing, health, community services, employment and training, justice, and/or education sectors
  • Organizations working with homeless or at-risk youth in large, medium or smaller-sized urban areas
  • Organizations working with Aboriginal youth on- or off-reserve, as well as organizations operating in rural or northern communities

Applicants must be an incorporated non-profit organization in Canada, or a registered charity or an organization sponsored by, or affiliated with, a registered charity.

Qui peut poser sa candidature pour un prix de 25 000 $?

  • Organismes communautaires œuvrant auprès de jeunes âgés de 15 à 30 ans inclusivement.
  • Organismes qui s’occupent des jeunes en leur offrant des services communautaires, liés au logement et à la santé, ou qui interviennent en matière d’emploi et de formation, de justice ou d’éducation.
  • Organismes œuvrant auprès de jeunes sans abri dans les grands, moyens ou petits centres urbains.
  • Organismes qui s’occupent de jeunes Autochtones à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur des réserves et aussi de ceux qui sont établis dans les collectivités rurales ou nordiques.

Les candidats doivent être des organismes canadiens sans but lucratif constitués en société; des organismes de bienfaisance enregistrés ou parrainés par un organisme de bienfaisance enregistré au Canada ou y être affiliés.

Definition / Définition

Homeless youth are those:

  • without physical shelter – living on the street; sleeping outdoors; staying in shelters and emergency hostels; temporarily staying with friends or ‘couch surfing.’

Youth at-risk are:

  • living where there is family conflict or violence
  • living in overcrowded conditions, physically unsafe dwellings, or illegal dwellings
  • living in a household that is paying so much for housing that there is no money left over for other necessities
  • vulnerable to losing their housing for economic, behavioural, addictions, and/or mental or physical health reasons.

Qu’entend Eva’s par « sans abri ou à risque de le devenir »?

Les jeunes sans abri sont ceux qui :

  • n’ont pas d’abri physique – ils vivent dans la rue; dorment à la belle étoile; demeurent dans des maisons d’hébergement ou des refuges d’urgence; s’installent temporairement chez des amis ou dorment chez l’un ou chez l’autre.

Les jeunes à risque de devenir sans abri sont ceux qui :

  • vivent dans un foyer marqué par la violence ou des conflits familiaux.
  • vivent dans une maison surpeuplée ou des logements illégaux ou dangereux et insalubres.
  • vivent dans un logement dont le loyer est si élevé qu’il ne reste plus d’argent pour répondre aux autres besoins essentiels.
  • risquent l’éviction pour des raisons économiques, comportementales, de toxicomanie ou de santé physique ou mentale.

Press Release April 15 2013

For immediate release:

Eva’s Initiatives, Sprott Foundation and Virgin Unite Announce Winners of the 2013 Awards for Ending Youth Homelessness

Four Canadian organizations recognized for excellence in working to prevent and end youth homelessness

Toronto, ON, April 15, 2013 – Eva’s Initiatives, the Sprott Foundation and Virgin Unite & Virgin Mobile’s RE*Generation are pleased to announce the four winners of The Eva’s Initiatives Award for Ending Youth Homelessness. Valued at $25,000 each, the awards recognize Canadian organizations that demonstrate leadership in preventing, reducing and ending youth homelessness in Canada.

“This Canadian awards program puts the spotlight on initiatives that actively work to prevent, reduce and end the homelessness that too many Canadian youth experience,” explained Maria Crawford, Executive Director of Eva’s Initiatives. “The winners this year demonstrate four different approaches to ending youth homelessness, each with their inherent strengths and opportunities.”

The four winners for 2013, from three different regions of the country, challenge us to think beyond the emergency needs of youth and instead find ways to equip them to achieve greater success in multiple domains of their life, from housing and employment, to education and social integration. The 2013 winners are:

  • Montréal/Cookshire, QC : Les Habitations Escalier for La ferme Aux Champêtreries
  • St. Catharines, ON: NiagaraResource Service for Youth for Youth Reconnect
  • Ottawa, ON: Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Youth and partners for Project STEP
  • Vancouver, BC: YWCA Metro Vancouverfor YWCA Crabtree Corner Housing

“RE*Generation supports organizations that inspire real change for at-risk and homeless youth,” says Andrew Bridge, Virgin Unite Trustee and Managing Director of Virgin Mobile Canada. “These four organizations have developed programs that inspire and empower youth to achieve greater success. We applaud their efforts and look forward to working with them to extend the reach of their programs.”

A seven member panel, knowledgeable about services for homeless youth, reviewed the applications and selected the winners from among 67 applications that demonstrated a wide array of impressive and innovative projects underway in communities across the county.

The Eva’s Initiatives Award for Ending Youth Homelessness is generously sponsored by the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite & Virgin Mobile’s RE*Generation.

To learn more about the RE*Generation Movement go to virginmobile.ca/regen.

About Eva’s Initiatives

Eva’s Initiatives works with homeless and at-risk youth, ages 16 to 24, to get them off the streets permanently. Each year we help over 5,000 homeless and at-risk youth through our emergency and transitional housing, harm reduction services, counselling, employment and training programs, social enterprise, and services to reconnect youth with their families. For more information: www.evasinitiatives.com

About Virgin Unite

Virgin Unite is the non-profit foundation of the Virgin Group. We unite people and entrepreneurial ideas to reinvent how we live and work in the world to help make people’s lives better. Our aim is to do our bit to revolutionize the way businesses, government and the social sector work together – driving business as a force for good.  We also incubate new, independent approaches to leadership including the Elders, the Carbon War Room, and the Branson Centres of Entrepreneurship. Virgin Unite’s overheads are covered by Sir Richard Branson and the Virgin Group, meaning that 100% of donations received go direct to the frontline where they are needed most. Join us at www.virginunite.com, follow us @virginunite and like us at facebook/virginunite.

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For more information or to inquire about interviews, please contact Lesley McMillan, Program Officer, Eva’s Initiatives (416) 977-4497 x 142   lesley@evasinitiatives.com

2013 Winners Awards English

2013 Winners Awards French

2013 Awards Winners

 

 

 

 

 

Winner : Les Habitations L’Escalier, a youth employment organization operating in Montréal and the Eastern Townships of Québec

“For several months now, I’ve been living at a shelter called l’Escalier. I also work at Distributions l’Escalier, and it’s my first job! With this job, I am also able to work from time to time at their Champêtreries farm. I like it there because you are constantly moving and learning new things! This experience allows me to meet new people and it also give me a place to relax and escape the stress of the city. I love it! Living and working at l’Escalier pushes me to think about my future. This has made me realize that I want to go back to school. The intervention team at home and work are very happy with my work and this gives me more confidence. Now I know how to cultivate onions! Before I didn’t even know that you had to rip the onions out of the earth.”

The initiative : La Ferme aux Champêtreries, a job entry program for young adults aged 18 to 30 who face barriers in accessing employment due to low educational achievement, lack of work experience, prior problems with addictions, family instability, and/or a precarious financial situation.

  • Paid work placement for 6 months on a farm
  • Partnerships with local employers in the region facilitates participants finding employment at the end of the placement

Impact for youth :

  •  Develop transferable technical, personal and social skills
  • Gain work experience in horticulture, agriculture, cooking, distribution, warehouse operations, and customer service
  • Skill development makes integration into community, education or occupational pursuits easier
  • Experience being members of a community  
  • In 2011-12: 6 months after placement, 55 % of participants had work, 26% had returned to school, and 3 % embarked on a new training program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winner: Niagara Resource Service for Youth (o/a The RAFT) based in St. Catharines, ON provides hostel and outreach services and independent living supports to high risk and homeless youth in throughout Niagara Region.

“I couldn’t live at home anymore. My dad and brother partied all the time and I couldn’t get any sleep or school work done. I missed school all the time because I was staying in Fort Erie and my school was in Ridgeway. My school thought it would be a good to meet Amber [Youth Reconnect Worker] and get some help. We met at my school. She helped me a lot and got me a really nice apartment. I couldn’t go to my high school anymore because I missed so much school. Amber got me into EDVanced where I can catch up on credits faster and be able to graduate on time. I should be able to go back to my high school next year if I get caught up. I would like to be back with my friends. Amber checks up on me all the time making sure I go to class and I know if I need anything she’s always there for me. “ RAFT participant

The initiative: Youth Reconnect which aims to keep precariously housed youth in school and connected to their community.  Working in partnership with local agencies, this homelessness prevention program:

  • Accepts referrals from high schools, community partners, social service agencies and police services
  • Helps youth access resources and increase their self sufficiency
  • Provides advocacy services, life skills training, one-on-one mentoring, and emergency hostel access
  • Helps youth find affordable housing, live independently, and remain housed
  • Facilitates family re-unification whenever possible and safe to do so
  • Focuses on assisting youth reduce involvement in high risk behaviours

Impact for youth:

  • Over 75 % of participants remain in school
  • Over 90 % of participants remain housed after 3 months with the service and 70 % remained housed after 6 months
  • Estimated to have reduced shelter usage by 370 youth individuals in 2011
  • 100 % of participants reported feeling safe and supported compared to only 30 % before connecting with the services
  • Increased feelings of connectedness with their own communities
  • Increased knowledge and ability to access a variety of community resources

 

 

Winner: This is a collaborative inter-agency partnership involving: Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health, Youville Centre, Operation Come Home, Eastern Ottawa Youth Justice Agency, and United Way Ottawa

“This is the best that I have ever done in my life, I am in school, I’m clean and I got a job.”

“Addiction and Mental Health Counselling helped me to break away from a vicious cycle. I deserve better and my daughter deserves better.”

The initiative: Project s.t.e.p.: provides substance abuse treatment as well as prevention and early intervention for young people in non-traditional academic settings. Each partner agency has a specific client focus, such as homeless youth, Aboriginal youth, teen mothers, at-risk or street involved youth.

  • Helps youth re-engage with academic achievement
  • Connects youth with addictions and mental health counselling
  • Multi-agency collaborative initiative with a common evaluation framework between agencies, common data collection and reporting platform

Impact for youth:

  • Increased access to individual counselling
  • Improved school attendance
  • Youth addressing mental health and addictions challenges and achieving high school equivalency
  • Increased motivation to continue on a path to independence and healthy living
  • Reduced participation in high risk activities

 

 

 

 

Winner: YWCA Metro Vancouver, a multi-service organization serving over 55,000 people annually through 43 programs.

“Crabtree Housing has helped me in so many ways. The support and encouragement I was given to make healthy, life changing choices was the most important piece for me. I was able to overcome my addiction to drugs. I was able to end toxic relationships and get a full-time job. I successfully regained custody of my daughter within a year. I take pride in providing for my daughter today and I am forever grateful to Crabtree’s staff, programs and the clean, safe apartment I lived in while making the most important decisions of my life.” Nora

The initiative: YWCA Crabtree Corner Housing provides 12 units of safe transitional housing and supports for young women who are recovering from drug and/or alcohol addictions and who are pregnant, have recently given birth, are currently parenting or are working to regain custody of their children.

  • Housing and supports are for up to 18 months
  • Initiatives to reduce barriers to affordable long-term housing such as grants to clear outstanding utility and housing debts
  • Resources to support personal and professional development

Impact for young mothers:

  • Support in recovering from drug and/or alcohol use
  • Success in connecting with other community resources
  • Opportunity to develop social and community networks
  • Pregnant women delivering healthy babies and retaining custody or regaining custody
  • Securing long-term housing after leaving Crabtree Corner

 

Niagara Resource Service for Youth

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winner – Niagara Resource Service for Youth (o/a The RAFT) based in St. Catharines, ON provides hostel and outreach services and independent living supports to high risk and homeless youth in throughout Niagara Region.

“I couldn’t live at home anymore. My dad and brother partied all the time and I couldn’t get any sleep or school work done. I missed school all the time because I was staying in Fort Erie and my school was in Ridgeway. My school thought it would be a good to meet Amber [Youth Reconnect Worker] and get some help. We met at my school. She helped me a lot and got me a really nice apartment. I couldn’t go to my high school anymore because I missed so much school. Amber got me into EDVanced where I can catch up on credits faster and be able to graduate on time. I should be able to go back to my high school next year if I get caught up. I would like to be back with my friends. Amber checks up on me all the time making sure I go to class and I know if I need anything she’s always there for me. “ RAFT participant

The initiative – Youth Reconnect which aims to keep precariously housed youth in school and connected to their community.  Working in partnership with local agencies, this homelessness prevention program:

  • Accepts referrals from high schools, community partners, social service agencies and police services
  • Helps youth access resources and increase their self sufficiency
  • Provides advocacy services, life skills training, one-on-one mentoring, and emergency hostel access
  • Helps youth find affordable housing, live independently, and remain housed
  • Facilitates family re-unification whenever possible and safe to do so
  • Focuses on assisting youth reduce involvement in high risk behaviours

Impact for youth –

  • Over 75 % of participants remain in school
  • Over 90 % of participants remain housed after 3 months with the service and 70 % remained housed after 6 months
  • Estimated to have reduced shelter usage by 370 youth individuals in 2011
  • 100 % of participants reported feeling safe and supported compared to only 30 % before connecting with the services
  • Increased feelings of connectedness with their own communities
  • Increased knowledge and ability to access a variety of community resources

YWCA Metro Vancouver

 

 

 

 

Winner: YWCA Metro Vancouver, a multi-service organization serving over 55,000 people annually through 43 programs.

Crabtree Housing has helped me in so many ways. The support and encouragement I was given to make healthy, life changing choices was the most important piece for me. I was able to overcome my addiction to drugs. I was able to end toxic relationships and get a full-time job. I successfully regained custody of my daughter within a year. I take pride in providing for my daughter today and I am forever grateful to Crabtree’s staff, programs and the clean, safe apartment I lived in while making the most important decisions of my life. Nora

The initiative: YWCA Crabtree Corner Housing provides 12 units of safe transitional housing and supports for young women who are recovering from drug and/or alcohol addictions and who are pregnant, have recently given birth, are currently parenting or are working to regain custody of their children.

  • Housing and supports are for up to 18 months
  • Initiatives to reduce barriers to affordable long-term housing such as grants to clear outstanding utility and housing debts
  • Resources to support personal and professional development

Impact for young mothers:

  • Support in recovering from drug and/or alcohol use
  • Success in connecting with other community resources
  • Opportunity to develop social and community networks
  • Pregnant women delivering healthy babies and retaining custody or regaining custody
  • Securing long-term housing after leaving Crabtree Corner