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Background

About the Awards

Eva’s Initiatives and the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite are pleased to offer four awards of $25,000 each for organizations working with homeless and at-risk youth.

The goal of the awards is to recognize community initiatives that are:

  • Moving beyond responding to the most basic needs of homeless and at-risk youth
  • Demonstrating significant impacts in the lives of vulnerable youth
  • Delivering programs or services aimed at preventing youth homelessness for example when youth are vulnerable do to encounters with criminal justice system, mental health crises, or when exiting from foster care, for example
  • Breaking the cycle of homelessness among youth by integrating supports such as: housing, education, employment, family connections, and interventions to address mental health concerns and/or addictions. This may also include strategies aimed at harm reduction and increasing the social inclusion of marginalized youth.

This is an Awards program, not a funding stream. The objective is to showcase and celebrate programs in Canada that have demonstrated impact in ending youth homelessness in their communities.

Organizations may self-nominate their own program or initiative.

About Eva’s Initiatives

Eva’s works locally and nationally to prevent, reduce and end youth homelessness in Canada. In Toronto, we operate 3 purpose-built emergency and transitional facilities that focus on family reconnection, harm reduction, employment, education, and life skills programming. Eva’s National Initiatives works to build the capacity of the youth-serving sector and foster systemic change nationally. We do this through an array of programs and projects, including convening the National Learning Community on Youth Homelessness and leading the Mobilizing Local Capacity to End Youth Homelessness Program.

What does Eva’s mean by ‘homeless or at-risk of homelessness’?

Homeless youth are those:

  • without physical shelter – living on the street; sleeping outdoors; staying in shelters and emergency hostels; temporarily staying with friends or ‘couch surfing.’

Youth at-risk are:

  • living where there is family conflict or violence
  • living in overcrowded conditions, physically unsafe dwellings, or illegal dwellings
  • living in a household that is paying so much for housing that there is no money left over for other necessities
  • vulnerable to losing their housing for economic, behavioural, addictions, and/or mental or physical health reasons.
  • Community organizations working with young people in age groups between 15 and 30
  • Organizations working with youth in the housing, health, community services, employment and training, justice, and/or education sectors
  • Organizations working with homeless or at-risk youth in large, medium or smaller-sized urban areas
  • Organizations working with Aboriginal youth on- or off-reserve, as well as organizations operating in rural or northern communities

Who is eligible for a $25,000 award?

Programs or initiatives nominated for this award should be operational for one or more years to have sufficient evidence of preventing, reducing and/or ending youth homelessness.

Applicants must be an incorporated non-profit organization in Canada, or a registered charity or an organization sponsored by, or affiliated with, a registered charity.

How do we nominate a program or initiative?

  • Nomination forms can be downloaded from evasinitiatives.com, or requested from awards@evas.ca
  • Use the nomination form to describe an initiative or program in your organization that is successful in preventing, reducing or ending youth homelessness. The initiative must be operational in 2014 with evidence of results to date.
  • Applications are due by email to awards@evas.ca no later than 9 pm EST on Thursday, January 15, 2015.
  • Send accompanying documents, such as financial statements or annual report, by email or letter mail, postmarked no later than Thursday January 15, 2015. Mailing address is: Eva’s Initiatives, 215 Spadina Ave., Suite 370, Toronto, ON M5T 2C7  Attention:  Awards Program. If emailing a very large document, send it as an attachment in a separate email.

Who chooses the winners?

Eva’s Initiatives has convened a National Review Panel with members from across the country who have extensive experience working with homeless youth and are leaders in ending youth homelessness in Canada. Winners will be announced in March 2015.

What will the National Review Panel look for?

  • Evidence that the initiative works primarily with youth and has been operational for a year or more
  • Innovative service delivery
  • Systems change initiatives and collaborative partnerships
  • Initiatives fostering greater social inclusion of youth
  • Evidence of positive impacts for youth
  • Evidence of a system for measuring results and outcome

Preference may be given to organizations who are not already participating in other ventures supported by Eva’s Initiatives including the Mobilizing Local Capacity to End Youth Homelessness program and the National Learning Community on Youth Homelessness.

For more information contact:

Deborah Hierlihy
Awards Coordinator
awards@evas.ca
(613) 471-1348

Our Sponsor

Eva’s Awards for Ending Youth Homelessness are generously sponsored by the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite.

History




In 2006, Eva’s Initiatives launched the Awards for Innovation, through generous sponsorship from CIBC. Six years of the Innovation Awards recognized the achievements of 18 organizations from coast to coast to coast. With inspiration coming from these award winners, the focus for Eva’s awards program has shifted.

With the launch of the 2014 program, Eva’s and our sponsor the Sprott Foundation are putting the spotlight on what works in terms of preventing, reducing and ending the homelessness that youth experience. This focus challenges us all to think beyond the emergency needs of vulnerable youth. The goal of ending homelessness means equipping youth in multiple domains of their life to achieve greater and longer lasting stability. It also means program impacts that have results on different levels—from housing outcomes, for example, to skill building, employment, improved health and other outcomes.

Welcome

Eva’s Initiatives, the Sprott Foundation and Virgin Unite, the non-profit foundation of the Virgin Group, are pleased to offer four awards of $25,000 each for organizations working with homeless and at-risk youth.

The goal of the awards is to recognize community initiatives that are:

  • Moving beyond responding to the most basic needs of homeless and at-risk youth
  • Demonstrating significant impacts in the lives of vulnerable youth
  • Delivering programs or services aimed at preventing youth homelessness for example when youth are vulnerable do to encounters with criminal justice system, mental health crises, or when exiting from foster care, for example
  • Breaking the cycle of homelessness among youth by integrating supports such as: housing, education, employment, family connections, and interventions to address mental health concerns and/or addictions. This may also include strategies aimed at harm reduction and increasing the social inclusion of marginalized youth.

This is an Awards program, not a funding stream. The objective is to showcase and celebrate programs in Canada that have demonstrated impact in ending youth homelessness in their communities.

Organizations may self-nominate their own program or initiative.

“Initiatives to prevent, reduce and end youth homelessness are indeed bold,” noted Maria Crawford, Executive Director of Eva’s Initiatives. “These awards are a way to recognize, honour and encourage organizations doing pioneering work that contributes to the national goal of ending youth homelessness.”

The deadline for applications is 9 pm EST, Wednesday January 29, 2014.

For more information please contact:<
Deborah Hierlihy
Awards Coordinator
awards@evas.ca
(613) 471-1348

Eligibility/ Admissibilité

Who can apply?

  • Community organizations working with young people in age groups between 15 and 30
  • Organizations working with youth in the housing, health, community services, employment and training, justice, and/or education sectors
  • Organizations working with homeless or at-risk youth in large, medium or smaller-sized urban areas
  • Organizations working with Aboriginal youth on- or off-reserve, as well as organizations operating in rural or northern communities

Applicants must be an incorporated non-profit organization in Canada, or a registered charity or an organization sponsored by, or affiliated with, a registered charity.

Qui peut poser sa candidature pour un prix de 25 000 $?

  • Organismes communautaires œuvrant auprès de jeunes âgés de 15 à 30 ans inclusivement.
  • Organismes qui s’occupent des jeunes en leur offrant des services communautaires, liés au logement et à la santé, ou qui interviennent en matière d’emploi et de formation, de justice ou d’éducation.
  • Organismes œuvrant auprès de jeunes sans abri dans les grands, moyens ou petits centres urbains.
  • Organismes qui s’occupent de jeunes Autochtones à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur des réserves et aussi de ceux qui sont établis dans les collectivités rurales ou nordiques.

Les candidats doivent être des organismes canadiens sans but lucratif constitués en société; des organismes de bienfaisance enregistrés ou parrainés par un organisme de bienfaisance enregistré au Canada ou y être affiliés.

Definition / Définition

Homeless youth are those:

  • without physical shelter – living on the street; sleeping outdoors; staying in shelters and emergency hostels; temporarily staying with friends or ‘couch surfing.’

Youth at-risk are:

  • living where there is family conflict or violence
  • living in overcrowded conditions, physically unsafe dwellings, or illegal dwellings
  • living in a household that is paying so much for housing that there is no money left over for other necessities
  • vulnerable to losing their housing for economic, behavioural, addictions, and/or mental or physical health reasons.

Qu’entend Eva’s par « sans abri ou à risque de le devenir »?

Les jeunes sans abri sont ceux qui :

  • n’ont pas d’abri physique – ils vivent dans la rue; dorment à la belle étoile; demeurent dans des maisons d’hébergement ou des refuges d’urgence; s’installent temporairement chez des amis ou dorment chez l’un ou chez l’autre.

Les jeunes à risque de devenir sans abri sont ceux qui :

  • vivent dans un foyer marqué par la violence ou des conflits familiaux.
  • vivent dans une maison surpeuplée ou des logements illégaux ou dangereux et insalubres.
  • vivent dans un logement dont le loyer est si élevé qu’il ne reste plus d’argent pour répondre aux autres besoins essentiels.
  • risquent l’éviction pour des raisons économiques, comportementales, de toxicomanie ou de santé physique ou mentale.

Overview / Aperçu

Eva’s Initiatives and the Sprott Foundation in collaboration with Virgin Unite are pleased to offer four awards of $25,000 each for organizations working with homeless and at-risk youth. 

The goal of the awards is to recognize community initiatives that are:

  • Moving beyond responding to the most basic needs of homeless and at-risk youth
  • Demonstrating significant impacts in the lives of vulnerable youth
  • Delivering programs or services aimed at preventing youth homelessness
  • Breaking the cycle of homelessness among youth by integrating supports such as: housing, education, employment, family connections, and interventions to address mental health concerns and/or addictions.

À propos des Prix

Eva’s Initiatives et la fondation Sprott, en collaboration avec Virgin Unite, ont le plaisir d’offrir quatre prix de 25 000 $ chacun à des organismes qui s’occupent de jeunes sans abri ou à risque de le devenir.

Ces prix ont pour but de reconnaître les initiatives communautaires qui :

  • Dépassent le stade de simplement assurer les besoins essentiels des jeunes sans abri ou à risque de le devenir
  • Démontrent qu’elles ont une influence durable dans la vie de jeunes à risque
  • Offrent des programmes ou des services visant à prévenir l’itinérance chez les jeunes
  • Rompent le cycle de l’itinérance chez les jeunes en incorporant des services de soutien tels que : logement, éducation, emploi, relations familiales, et interventions afin de traiter des problèmes de santé mentale ou de toxicomanie.

 

Project s.t.e.p.

 

 

 

Winner: This is a collaborative inter-agency partnership involving: Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health, Youville Centre, Operation Come Home, Eastern Ottawa Youth Justice Agency, and United Way Ottawa

“This is the best that I have ever done in my life, I am in school, I’m clean and I got a job.”

“Addiction and Mental Health Counselling helped me to break away from a vicious cycle. I deserve better and my daughter deserves better.”

The initiative: Project s.t.e.p.: provides substance abuse treatment as well as prevention and early intervention for young people in non-traditional academic settings. Each partner agency has a specific client focus, such as homeless youth, Aboriginal youth, teen mothers, at-risk or street involved youth.

  • Helps youth re-engage with academic achievement
  • Connects youth with addictions and mental health counselling
  • Multi-agency collaborative initiative with a common evaluation framework between agencies, common data collection and reporting platform

Impact for youth:

  • Increased access to individual counselling
  • Improved school attendance
  • Youth addressing mental health and addictions challenges and achieving high school equivalency
  • Increased motivation to continue on a path to independence and healthy living
  • Reduced participation in high risk activities

Le Projet r.é.p.a.

 

 

 

Le gagnant : C’est un partenariat de collaboration entre Le Centre de santé autochtone Wabano, le Youville Centre, Opération rentrer au foyer, l’Agence de justice pénale pour adolescents de l’Est de l’Ontario, et Centraide Ottawa

L’initiative : Le Projet r.é.p.a. offre des services de traitement de la toxicomanie et aussi de prévention et d’intervention précoce à des jeunes fréquentant des milieux scolaires non traditionnels. Chaque organisme partenaire se consacre à une clientèle spécifique telle que jeunes sans abri, jeunes autochtones, mères adolescentes, jeunes dans la rue ou à risque de le devenir.

  • Aide les jeunes à poursuivre leur scolarité
  • Dirige les jeunes vers des services de counselling en toxicomanie et en santé mentale
  • Initiative de collaboration multiorganisationnelle ayant en commun un cadre d’évaluation, une collecte de données et une base pour l’établissement de rapports

Répercussions chez les jeunes:

  • Accès élargi à des services de counselling individuel
  • Amélioration de l’assiduité scolaire
  • Les jeunes s’attaquent à leurs problèmes de santé mentale et de toxicomanie et obtiennent l’équivalent d’un diplôme d’études secondaires
  • Motivation accrue pour cheminer vers une vie autonome et saine
  • Diminution de la participation à des activités à risques élevés
PinkWinner

The Doorway

The DoorwayThe Doorway, A Youth Employment Society in Calgary, AB, providing community support for youth who are making self-directed changes to move their life experience from street dependency to mainstream sustainability.

The initiative:  The Doorway: Cultural Integration for Street Dependent Young People invests in youth who are developing and pursuing their own life goals related to housing, employment, legal, health, leadership, identification, finances, drug and alcohol use, education and volunteering. The Doorway provides a bridge for youth who have developed knowledge of how to survive on the streets who then need to develop knowledge and strategies for surviving in different mainstream environments, such as workplaces or with family.

Impact for youth: 

  • Provides a safe and legal means of income through financial incentives available to youth who achieve steps in their plan and/or who contribute to the Doorway’s qualitative database and monthly self assessment opportunities
  • Fosters a change personal patterns leading to healthier and safer lifestyles
  • Supports youth in taking steps towards housing and employment as well as goals in other life domains
  • Members of the mainstream community learn how to foster the social inclusion of street dependent young people in mainstream culture